Give us a King

In the biblical story of Samuel, we read the narrative of a nation’s descent from prosperity and peace into poverty and war.  Israel declined as men did what was “right in their own eyes”.  Samuel was a prophet, and his messages from God led the people.  But the sons of Samuel went unrestrained.  Church became a business.  Lust and greed reigned.  Samuel’s sons stole the people’s sacrifices and fornicated at the door of the church.  People of all tribes felt the defilement, and lost heart.  They drifted away.  The people did not want God.  Give us a king!  A king should be tall, dark, and handsome.  They wanted a rock star.  We the people are willing to relinquish our freedoms to a king who is like us, only better.  We won’t need God.  The king will solve our problems.  The government will take care of our problems.  No more moral rules.  Give us a king, though tyranny will result.  God can give what we demand, though He foreknows the painful consequences.  The people of Israel wanted a king, and they got Saul.  Tall, handsome, and shivering with fear on the day of his coronation.  Saul quickly fell from serving God into trying to please the people, taking opinion polls.  Ultimately, he was destroyed by enemies from abroad.  His people perished, and wickedness prevailed.  Saul’s life spiralled down through paranoia, murderous rage, and cowardice.  As Saul was falling, God raised up the greatest king of Israel.  God raised up a man after His own heart.  It took years to make the transition.  King David was God’s idea of a leader:  devoted to God, humble, courageous, a hard-working warrior.  Imperfect, but with a heart to repent.  It matters what is hidden in the heart of any man who would be king.  There is no separation between public life and private morality.  Immorality never remains private.  Let us not chose a tyrant.  Lord, anoint Your man and raise him to the pinnacle of political power in our nation.

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